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Assessing US Government bulletin boards: problems, policy issues and recommendations

John Carlo Bertot ((jcbertot @ mailbox.syr.edu) doctoral candidate at the School of Information Studies, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY. During 1992‐1993, he served as research associate for a study funded by the U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment which concluded with a report Federal Information Policy and the Management for Electronic Services Delivery. He also was a research associate from 1991 to 1992 for a national study of info rmation technology management in county government which resulted in the book Managing Information Technology: Transforming County Governments in the 1990s. Prior to his work at Syracuse University, Bertot spent four years managing the Office Automation Training and Support Division for the New York State Assembly, Office Automation and Data Processing Department)
Charles R. McClure ((cmcclure @ suvm.syr.edu) Professor at the School of Information Studies, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY. He teaches courses in U.S. government information management and policies, information resources management, library/information center management, and planning/evaluation of information services. He is the editor of Internet Research and has written extensively on topics relatied to U.S. government information, information resour ces management(IRM), and information policy. He served as principal investigator in 1992‐1993 for a study funded by the U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment, that resulted in the report Federal Information Policy and the Management for Electronic Services Delivery. His most recent book is Libraries and the Internet/NREN: Issues, Perspectives, and Opportunities(Meckerlermedia, 1994).)

Internet Research

ISSN: 1066-2243

Article publication date: 1 March 1994

300

Abstract

Federal government agencies increasingly use electronic bulletin board technology as a means of providing access to and dissemination of electronic government information. This paper identifies and analyzes existing government bulletin boards (BBSs). It also assesses the types of information available to information users on the BBSs as well as the cost and technological access issues involved in federal agency use of BBSs. Furthermore, the paper presents a typology of bulletin boards. Finally, it discusses information policy implications resulting from BBS development, especially with regard to access and dissemination of electronic government information. These “new” access mechanisms are often‐times difficult to use, are poorly deployed and operated, and may serve to limit access to some types of government information.

Keywords

Citation

Carlo Bertot, J. and McClure, C.R. (1994), "Assessing US Government bulletin boards: problems, policy issues and recommendations", Internet Research, Vol. 4 No. 1, pp. 45-63. https://doi.org/10.1108/10662249410798830

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1994, MCB UP Limited

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