To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

The indirect economic effects of a terrorist attack on transport infrastructure: a proposal for a SAGE

Mark Thissen (The Netherlands Institute for Spatial Research, TNO Inro, The Hague, The Netherlands, and the School of Business, Public Administration and Technology (BBT), University of Twente, Twente, The Netherlands)

Disaster Prevention and Management

ISSN: 0965-3562

Article publication date: 1 September 2004

Abstract

After the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center in New York on 11 September 2001 there is an increased fear of terrorism. The transport sector seems to be a main target for terrorism. Not only air‐traffic, but also main traffic junctions such as tunnels and bridges may be possible targets of terrorists. The horrific attacks on several trains in Madrid in 2004, illustrate ones more the credibility of these threats. This paper addresses the question how to measure the indirect effects of a terrorist attack on transport infrastructure via an increase in transport costs, and discusses a approach how a government may find the economically most vulnerable links in the infrastructure network. It is proposed to use a spatial applied general equilibrium model in the new economic geography tradition to measure the indirect economic effects.

Keywords

Citation

Thissen, M. (2004), "The indirect economic effects of a terrorist attack on transport infrastructure: a proposal for a SAGE", Disaster Prevention and Management, Vol. 13 No. 4, pp. 315-322. https://doi.org/10.1108/09653560410556537

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited