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Sex role stereotyping and requisites of successful top managers

Susan Vinnicombe (Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Diversity Management at Cranfield School of Management, Cranfield University, Cranfield, UK.)
Val Singh (Senior Research Fellow, at Cranfield School of Management, Cranfield University, Cranfield, UK.)

Women in Management Review

ISSN: 0964-9425

Article publication date: 1 May 2002

4781

Abstract

The issue of management style and women’s progression has been highlighted in the past, but women’s perceptions of successful management styles are important too, especially where women’s own preferred management style differs from their view of the top team. Such differences can lead to women not putting themselves forward for promotion. Reports a study of male and female managers in one very large insurance company. Uses the personality attributes questionnaire (PAQ) to identify the managers’ own management style, and their perceptions of the style of “the successful manager” who had reached the top team in their organisation. The PAQ identifies two dimensions of management from which four categories can be found. The survey of 363 managers revealed significant gender differences. The study provides further evidence of a shift in perceptions of leadership styles towards androgynous management, high on both instrumental and expressive traits. However, women are still thinking in “think manager, think male” mode, which may limit their confidence to put themselves forward for promotion.

Keywords

Citation

Vinnicombe, S. and Singh, V. (2002), "Sex role stereotyping and requisites of successful top managers", Women in Management Review, Vol. 17 No. 3/4, pp. 120-130. https://doi.org/10.1108/09649420210425264

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 2002, MCB UP Limited

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