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The human face of re‐engineering in financial services

Darren McCabe (Lecturer in Organisational Analysis at the Department of Management, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK)
David Knights (Professor of Organisational Analysis at the Department of Management, Keele University, Staffordshire, UK)

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal

ISSN: 0960-4529

Publication date: 1 April 2000

Abstract

Managers are increasingly using the term “business process re‐engineering” to rationalise and describe a variety of innovations, irrespective of their content. Programmes of re‐engineering have been designed simply as a means to cut costs; one of the major costs being that of people. The neglect of people in the design of re‐engineering programmes has resulted in “operational” managers being forced to address issues such as low staff morale, poor job satisfaction and high levels of stress after a new structure or system has been put in place. This has resulted in attempts to improve communication and promote a consultative and open style of management. Job rotation, enlargement and enrichment have also been targets for improvement, and a greater emphasis has been placed on teamworking. An emerging phenomenon, which we feel is conducive to teamworking, is that of management involving employees in a discussion of service quality and what it means to work in their respective organisations. Critically, following these discussions, management must attempt to address the issues raised by employees.

Keywords

Citation

McCabe, D. and Knights, D. (2000), "The human face of re‐engineering in financial services", Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, Vol. 10 No. 2, pp. 74-78. https://doi.org/10.1108/09604520010318263

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

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