Weblogs as a bridging genre

Susan C. Herring (School of Library and Information Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA)
Lois Ann Scheidt (School of Library and Information Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA)
Elijah Wright (School of Library and Information Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA)
Sabrina Bonus (School of Library and Information Science, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA)

Information Technology & People

ISSN: 0959-3845

Publication date: 1 June 2005

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to describe systematically the characteristics of weblogs (blogs) – frequently modified web pages in which dated entries are listed in reverse chronological sequence and which are the latest genre of internet communication to attain widespread popularity.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the results of a quantitative content analysis of 203 randomly selected blogs, comparing the empirically observable features of the corpus with popular claims about the nature of blogs, and finding them to differ in a number of respects.

Findings

Notably, blog authors, journalists and scholars alike exaggerate the extent to which blogs are interlinked, interactive, and oriented towards external events, and underestimate the importance of blogs as individualistic, intimate forms of self‐expression.

Originality/value

Based on the profile generated by the empirical analysis, considers the likely antecedents of the blog genre, situates it with respect to the dominant forms of digital communication on the internet today, and suggests possible developments of the use of blogs over time in response to changes in user behavior, technology, and the broader ecology of internet genres.

Keywords

Citation

Herring, S., Scheidt, L., Wright, E. and Bonus, S. (2005), "Weblogs as a bridging genre", Information Technology & People, Vol. 18 No. 2, pp. 142-171. https://doi.org/10.1108/09593840510601513

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Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2005, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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