To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

The presence, nature and effects of job stress on physical and psychological health at a large Australian university

Christopher F. Sharpley (Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia)
Roisin Reynolds (Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia)
Alicia Acosta (Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia)
Jagdish K. Dua (University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia)

Journal of Educational Administration

ISSN: 0957-8234

Article publication date: 1 October 1996

Abstract

Examines how data on job stress, health, anxiety and daily hassle were collected via survey questionnaires from 1,925 staff at Monash University campuses. The sample included academic, general, administrative, technical and library staff, with both genders and representation from age, employment and seniority groupings. Shows that results indicated significant positive relationships between job stress and anxiety, daily hassle, and health, the latter suggesting that self‐reported stress at work was associated with absence from work, visits to medical practitioners, and frequency of illnesses and accidents. Reports comparisons across campus, gender, age and job type, and makes some overall contrasts between these data and those previously reported for a rural university. Discusses implications for health promotion among university staff.

Keywords

Citation

Sharpley, C.F., Reynolds, R., Acosta, A. and Dua, J.K. (1996), "The presence, nature and effects of job stress on physical and psychological health at a large Australian university", Journal of Educational Administration, Vol. 34 No. 4, pp. 73-86. https://doi.org/10.1108/09578239610128630

Publisher

:

MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1996, MCB UP Limited