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The incomplete naturalist. Donald Willower on science and inquiry in educational administration

Gabriele Lakomski (The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, and)
Colin W. Evers (The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)

Journal of Educational Administration

ISSN: 0957-8234

Article publication date: 1 October 2001

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Abstract

Considers Willower’s theory of inquiry and his stance on science and epistemology which is derived from Dewey’s pragmatist philosophy. Argues that Willower’s naturalism, following Dewey’s understanding, remains incomplete because Dewey did not have at his disposal the required causal neurobiological detail of human learning and cognition. Such detail has recently become available, and Dewey’s biological metaphors are now being cashed out in relation to the causal mechanisms of inquiry, with interesting consequences for Willower’s theory of inquiry. Concludes the article by exploring the notion of reflective inquiry in relation to human cognition, research methodology and organizational cognition.

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Citation

Lakomski, G. and Evers, C.W. (2001), "The incomplete naturalist. Donald Willower on science and inquiry in educational administration", Journal of Educational Administration, Vol. 39 No. 5, pp. 442-454. https://doi.org/10.1108/09578230110402549

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 2001, MCB UP Limited