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The effects of customer service on consumer complaining behavior

Jeffrey G. Blodgett (Assistant Professor, Department of Management and Marketing, at the University of Mississippi, Mississippi, USA.)
Kirk L. Wakefield (Assistant Professor, Department of Management and Marketing, at the University of Mississippi, Mississippi, USA.)
James H. Barnes (Professor of Marketing and Pharmacy, Department of Management and Marketing, at the University of Mississippi, Mississippi, USA.)

Journal of Services Marketing

ISSN: 0887-6045

Article publication date: 1 October 1995

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Abstract

Presents a dynamic model of the consumer complaining behavior process. Is unique in that it distinguishes between negative word‐of‐mouth that occurs prior to seeking redress (or in lieu of seeking redress) and negative word‐of‐mouth that occurs after seeking redress. Another unique aspect of this study is that it specifically recognizes positive word‐of‐mouth as a possible post‐complaint response. The results indicate that the major factor that determines why some dissatisfied consumers seek redress and give the seller a chance to remedy the problem, while others exit and engage in negative word‐of‐mouth behavior, is the perceived likelihood of success. Results also show that, once a dissatisfied customer seeks redress, that person expects to receive a fair settlement but, more importantly, to be treated with courtesy and respect. Based on these results, discusses the pervasive effects of customer service on consumer complaining behavior, and offers managerial recommendations.

Keywords

Citation

Blodgett, J.G., Wakefield, K.L. and Barnes, J.H. (1995), "The effects of customer service on consumer complaining behavior", Journal of Services Marketing, Vol. 9 No. 4, pp. 31-42. https://doi.org/10.1108/08876049510094487

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1995, MCB UP Limited