An analysis of the rates of injury and fatal accidents in Michigan State police pursuits: a Michigan emergency response study

Dennis M. Payne (Michigan State University)
John Charles Fenske (Sam Houston State University)

American Journal of Police

ISSN: 0735-8547

Publication date: 1 December 1996

Abstract

Compares accident injuries and fatalities occurring during a one‐year Michigan emergency response study (MERS) with figures for the state’s general population accidents over three and five years. Finds that significantly higher rates of accidents occur in pursuits than in the general population or in police non‐pursuit experience but that the MERS fatal accident rate was not significantly higher than in the general population. Suggests that this is partly explained by officers having the advantage of defensive driving training and by a Hawthorne effect; also alcohol consumption is a common factor in general accidents. Points out that non‐fatal injuries were significantly higher than comparable groups. Advocates the establishment of a database built on a mandatory police pursuit reporting system.

Keywords

Citation

Payne, D. and Fenske, J. (1996), "An analysis of the rates of injury and fatal accidents in Michigan State police pursuits: a Michigan emergency response study", American Journal of Police, Vol. 15 No. 4, pp. 95-116. https://doi.org/10.1108/07358549610151834

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Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1996, MCB UP Limited

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