Lignin from waste black liquor 3‐treated lignin in phenol formaldehyde resin

A.M.A. Nada (A.M.A. Nada is Professor of Cellulose Chemistry and Technology at the Cellulose and Paper Department, National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo, Egypt.)
M.A. Yousef (M.A. Yousef is Professor of Organic Chemistry at the Faculty of Science, Helwan University, Helwan, Cairo, Egypt.)
K.A. Shaffei (K.A. Shaffei is a Lecturer at the Faculty of Science, Helwan University, Helwan, Cairo, Egypt.)
A. Salah (A. Salah is an Assistant Lecturer, at the Faculty of Science, Helwan University, Helwan, Cairo, Egypt.)

Pigment & Resin Technology

ISSN: 0369-9420

Publication date: 1 December 2000

Abstract

Bagasse and rice straw lignins undergo different treatments, e.g. acid hydrolysis, oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and thermal treatment, before being used as a partial replacement for phenol in phenol formaldehyde resin. These treatments improved the resin formation properties of the lignin. The effect of these treatments on the improvement of the properties of the resin produced has the following sequence: lignin treated with HCl (1‐3N) > lignin treated with H2O2 (1‐3 per cent) > thermally treated lignin (120‐140°C). The improvement of the properties of the resin produced from bagasse lignin is greater than that produced from rice straw lignin. The treatment of rice straw lignin with acid increases its ability to form a resin. Treatment of rice straw lignin with acid leads to its increased concentration in the phenol lignin formaldehyde resin with good properties. In general, the resin produced from treated lignin has better properties than resin produced from untreated lignin.

Keywords

Citation

Nada, A., Yousef, M., Shaffei, K. and Salah, A. (2000), "Lignin from waste black liquor 3‐treated lignin in phenol formaldehyde resin", Pigment & Resin Technology, Vol. 29 No. 6, pp. 337-343. https://doi.org/10.1108/03699420010355148

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 2000, MCB UP Limited

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