Earthquake prediction, Wolfram Alpha, neuroimaging

Alex M. Andrew (Reading, UK)

Kybernetes

ISSN: 0368-492X

Publication date: 3 May 2011

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review proposals for earthquake prediction and study using accelerometers incorporated in laptop computers. Also reviewed is a lecture by Stephen Wolfram, creator of the Mathematica software package, introducing a new venture called Wolfram Alpha that combines computation with access to real‐world data. Developments in neural imaging techniques and some findings are discussed, including a remarkable manifestation of neural plasticity.

Design/methodology/approach

The aim is to review developments on the internet, especially those of general cybernetic interest.

Findings

Use of accelerometers, incorporated in laptop computers for a different purpose, appears to offer valuable opportunities for earthquake prediction and study. Exactly what will emerge from the Wolfram‐Alpha initiative remains to be seen but it holds great promise. New neuroimaging techniques have shown their worth in producing new findings, including one that reveals interesting neural plasticity.

Practical implications

Earthquake prediction and study, especially by a means that can be implemented quickly and cheaply, is of obvious value in quake‐prone areas such as California. Wolfram Alpha may come to be as familiar a tool as search engines are today. A primary aim of cybernetics is unravelling the working of the central nervous system, and both ethical and practical considerations favour non‐invasive means of investigation such as new neuroimaging techniques that have already proved their worth.

Originality/value

It is hoped this is a valuable periodic review.

Keywords

Citation

Andrew, A. (2011), "Earthquake prediction, Wolfram Alpha, neuroimaging", Kybernetes, Vol. 40 No. 3/4, pp. 585-588. https://doi.org/10.1108/03684921111156642

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Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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