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A study of work‐family conflict, family‐work conflict and the contingent effect of self‐efficacy of retail salespeople in a transitional economy

Cristian Chelariu (Sawyer School of Business, Suffolk University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA)
Rodney Stump (Towson University, Towson, Maryland, USA)

European Journal of Marketing

ISSN: 0309-0566

Article publication date: 15 November 2011

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to contribute to the growing cross‐national body of literature on work‐family conflict (WFC) and family‐work conflict (FWC) issues by examining the interrelationship of these constructs with other variables in the context of a transitional economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using self‐report questionnaires distributed to retail salespeople in Hungary. Hypothesis tests were conducted using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results revealed that WFC is strongly related to job stress, while FWC is not, and that job stress fully mediates the effect of WFC on turnover intentions. It was also found that self‐efficacy, as a moderator, heightened the positive effect of WFC on job stress, but attenuated the effect of FWC.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could examine both the deleterious and beneficial effects of role identity spillover and include additional psychological work outcomes beyond turnover intentions. Assessing the impact of collective efficacy in addition to individual self‐efficacy is also warranted in future studies conducted in transitional economies, especially those with collectivistic cultures.

Social implications

The authors' evidence that WFC is more strongly related to job stress than FWC underscores the need for retailers to implement progressive policies to create supportive work environments, which can reduce WFC and FWC. The finding of the contingent effect of self‐efficacy also has important implications for recruiting and training practices of retailers operating in transitional economies.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to compile the multiple theoretical rationales for the moderating effect of self‐efficacy and empirical evidence that it operates in opposite ways relative to WFC and FWC.

Keywords

Citation

Chelariu, C. and Stump, R. (2011), "A study of work‐family conflict, family‐work conflict and the contingent effect of self‐efficacy of retail salespeople in a transitional economy", European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 45 No. 11/12, pp. 1660-1679. https://doi.org/10.1108/03090561111167333

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited