Revisiting the pioneering market orientation model in an emerging economy

Musa Dwairi (College of Science and Liberal Arts, Grambling State University, Grambling, Louisiana, USA)
Shahid N. Bhuian (College of Administration and Business, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, Louisiana, USA)
Anthony Jurkus (College of Administration and Business, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, Louisiana, USA)

European Journal of Marketing

ISSN: 0309-0566

Publication date: 31 July 2007

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to replicate Kohli and Jaworski, and Kohli's pioneering market orientation model within a highly growth‐oriented and competitive banking industry in an emerging Middle‐Eastern economy, Jordan.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among top management personnel of 475 bank branches in Jordan. A total of 11 hypotheses related to market orientation; its antecedents and consequences were examined by estimating multiple regression models.

Findings

The study confirms that market orientation‐performance relationship is robust across diverse contexts. Also, top management traits are consistent predictors of market orientation. However, organizational factors as direct and linear determinants of market orientation are not completely stable. Further, the nature of the correlations between environmental factors and market orientation may be more complex than has been believed. In addition, within‐country variations along Hofstede's cultural dimensions may be possible. Finally, most scales including that of market orientation suffer from weaknesses.

Originality/value

This paper provides further validation for a market orientation model and unveils some of its weaknesses and strengths.

Keywords

Citation

Dwairi, M., Bhuian, S.N. and Jurkus, A. (2007), "Revisiting the pioneering market orientation model in an emerging economy", European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 41 No. 7/8, pp. 713-721. https://doi.org/10.1108/03090560710752357

Download as .RIS

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2007, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below

You may be able to access this content by logging in via Shibboleth, Open Athens or with your Emerald account.
To rent this content from Deepdyve, please click the button.
If you think you should have access to this content, click the button to contact our support team.