The impact of national stereotypes on the country of origin effect

Michael Chattalas (Department of Marketing, College of Business Administration, Fordham University, Bronx, New York, USA)
Thomas Kramer (Department of Marketing and International Business, Zicklin School of Business, Baruch College, City University of New York, New York, USA)
Hirokazu Takada (Department of Marketing and International Business, Zicklin School of Business, Baruch College, City University of New York, New York, USA)

International Marketing Review

ISSN: 0265-1335

Publication date: 22 February 2008

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advances a conceptual framework in which the impact of national stereotype dimensions on country of origin (COO) effects is explicitly modeled and decomposed.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes that the perceived warmth and perceived competence dimensions of national stereotypes underlie COO effects. The conceptual framework posits research propositions on the potential interactions of these dimensions with product type (such as hedonic versus utilitarian and high‐ versus low‐contact services), while the effects of consumer characteristics (such as cultural orientation, expertise, involvement, and ethnocentrism) are explored.

Findings

The Stereotype Content Model is a useful tool in exploring the relationship between national stereotypes and COO‐based evaluations as it represents a major theoretical advance in the systematic study of stereotype contents.

Practical implications

The advanced conceptual framework holds significant practical implications for the international marketing strategies of corporations as well as nations.

Originality/value

This paper proposes an original conceptualization and testable research propositions regarding the relationship between national stereotype contents and COO‐based consumer evaluations of products.

Keywords

Citation

Chattalas, M., Kramer, T. and Takada, H. (2008), "The impact of national stereotypes on the country of origin effect", International Marketing Review, Vol. 25 No. 1, pp. 54-74. https://doi.org/10.1108/02651330810851881

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Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2008, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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