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Integrating country of origin into global marketing strategy: A review of US marking statutes

Irvine Clarke (Meinders School of Business, Oklahoma City University, USA)
Margaret Owens (Meinders School of Business, Oklahoma City University, USA)
John B. Ford (College of Business and Public Administration, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, USA)

International Marketing Review

ISSN: 0265-1335

Article publication date: 1 April 2000

Abstract

Country‐of‐origin research has frequently found country markings to affect consumer product evaluations, providing country‐of‐origin markings a unique opportunity to become an evermore important element in the global strategic mix. However, marketing literature has been delinquent in providing international strategists meaningful aids for obtaining wanted “made in” designations. Therefore, this study provides an examination of the four major legal tests (name, character and use; essence; value added; and article of commerce) which constitute the US marking statutes. Explanations of the tests, with practical examples, are provided to enhance marketing practitioners’ abilities for integrating country‐of‐origin markings into overall global strategic design.

Keywords

Citation

Clarke, I., Owens, M. and Ford, J.B. (2000), "Integrating country of origin into global marketing strategy: A review of US marking statutes", International Marketing Review, Vol. 17 No. 2, pp. 114-126. https://doi.org/10.1108/02651330010322606

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

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