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In search of relevance: Is there an academic‐practitioner divide in business‐to‐business marketing?

Ross Brennan (Middlesex University, Hendon, UK)
Paul Ankers (Southampton Institute, Southampton, UK)

Marketing Intelligence & Planning

ISSN: 0263-4503

Article publication date: 1 August 2004

Abstract

This article reports on three related empirical studies of the relevance of academic research to management practice in the field of business‐to‐business marketing. These studies comprise a survey of 58 academic researchers, a qualitative study of ten marketing practitioners, and a qualitative study of eight academic researchers. Academic researchers in the field of business‐to‐business marketing believe that their work is of interest, potential value, and relevance to practitioners, and aspire to make a contribution to management practice. Practitioners claim not to be interested in academic research, and are more favourably disposed towards consultants, who they see as more responsive to, and understanding of, business pressures. It seems clear that although academics would like to get closer to practitioners, they are inhibited by institutional factors, such as academic reward systems and the “publish or perish” culture. Mechanisms for improving the degree of cooperation between researchers and practitioners are explored.

Keywords

Citation

Brennan, R. and Ankers, P. (2004), "In search of relevance: Is there an academic‐practitioner divide in business‐to‐business marketing?", Marketing Intelligence & Planning, Vol. 22 No. 5, pp. 511-519. https://doi.org/10.1108/02634500410551897

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited