To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

Modelling and managing affective psychology in Australian local government facilities

Chris Heywood (Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia)
Gregory Missingham (Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia)
Russell Kenley (Australian Graduate School of Entrepreneurship, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Australia)

Facilities

ISSN: 0263-2772

Article publication date: 2 March 2010

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish a basis for considering and then studying the affective psychology found in subjective assessments encountered in managing facility provision, in this case in Australian local government.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature was used to construct a suite of models that provides a legitimate basis to consider affective, subjective and other assessments in the field. A psychologically‐based orientational qualitative enquiry using an Affective Lexicon was used for an empirical study.

Findings

The study found that affect is pervasive in the management of local government facilities. It was found in expectations facility management has concerning consequences of its work, stakeholders' expectations and evaluations, and had utility in managing facility projects. A Scheme of Affective Management is proposed that uses a suite of techniques to achieve affective outcomes and consequences from facility management. These results challenge so‐called objectivity in the field.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical study occurred in Australian local government but it is likely that the results are generalisable to other countries and also to the private sector and could apply more generally to effective facility management.

Practical implications

A Scheme of Affective Management is introduced that provides a suite of practices that could be employed to manage facility projects' affective outcomes.

Originality/value

The field embraces the psychology of facilities. This paper is a very early example that demonstrates that considering psychology in the management of facilities is also important.

Keywords

Citation

Heywood, C., Missingham, G. and Kenley, R. (2010), "Modelling and managing affective psychology in Australian local government facilities", Facilities, Vol. 28 No. 3/4, pp. 156-174. https://doi.org/10.1108/02632771011023122

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2010, Emerald Group Publishing Limited