To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

Measuring the occupational health and safety performance of construction companies in Australia

John Lin (John Lin is at the Department of Architecture, Building and Planning, University of Melbourne, Australia.)
Anthony Mills (Anthony Mills is at the Department of Architecture, Building and Planning, University of Melbourne, Australia.)

Facilities

ISSN: 0263-2772

Article publication date: 1 March 2001

Downloads
12431

Abstract

Many facility managers are now required to deal directly with small firms engaged in the maintenance, alteration and cleaning of physical infrastructure. Increasingly the performance of small firms reflects on the manager of the facility, and so an understanding of their operation is required. It is mandatory for all firms to provide a safe working environment for their workers and subcontractors. Consequently, occupational health and safety (OHS) is a major issue for companies mainly due to the fear of prosecution. The introduction of Zero Tolerance by the Victorian government WorkCover Authority in 1999 provided even higher OHS safety standards for the construction industry. This has placed an increased burden on construction and maintenance companies especially small firms that are not in a position of financial strength. The size of the company has been found to be a major contributing factor to the OHS performance of construction contractors. This research is based on a benchmarking study of 44 construction companies in Victoria, Australia. The results show that the major factors influencing safety performance were; company size, and management and employee commitment to OHS.

Keywords

Citation

Lin, J. and Mills, A. (2001), "Measuring the occupational health and safety performance of construction companies in Australia", Facilities, Vol. 19 No. 3/4, pp. 131-139. https://doi.org/10.1108/02632770110381676

Publisher

:

MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 2001, MCB UP Limited