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Needs Analysis Theory and the Effectiveness of Large‐scale Government‐sponsored Training Programmes: A Case Study

Phillip C. Wright (University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, Canada)
Gary D. Geroy (Colorado State University at Fort Collins, USA)

Journal of Management Development

ISSN: 0262-1711

Publication date: 1 May 1992

Abstract

Reports on a study of current and past training literature which suggests that, to be effective and to isolate both training needs and those problems having other, non‐trainable solutions, training must be preceded by a needs analysis. Proposes a needs assessment model to illustrate an optimum needs assessment process, and compares this model with the Ontario Government′s “Ontario Skill” (OS) programme, a multi‐million dollar, provincially‐funded training scheme. If, as the literature suggests, needs assessment must preclude training, then it is likely that OS monies are being wasted, as under the current administrative system it is virtually impossible to conduct in‐depth assessments. Suggests ways in which needs assessment can be improved, by shifting the burden from the Government′s consultants onto specially‐trained employer representatives. It is felt that such a shift would enable sufficient time to be spent on the thousands of needs assessments conducted every year under the auspices of this massive training initiative. The methodology suggested here would be applicable to any large‐scale provincial or state‐run industrial training programme.

Keywords

Citation

Wright, P.C. and Geroy, G.D. (1992), "Needs Analysis Theory and the Effectiveness of Large‐scale Government‐sponsored Training Programmes: A Case Study", Journal of Management Development, Vol. 11 No. 5, pp. 16-27. https://doi.org/10.1108/02621719210014527

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1992, MCB UP Limited