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Equal employment opportunity: acculturation experience of immigrant medical professionals in New Zealand in the period 1995 to 2000

Christopher Selvarajah (Australian Graduate School of Entrepreneurship, Mail H25, Swinburne University, PO Box 218, Hawthorn Vic 3122)

Equal Opportunities International

ISSN: 0261-0159

Article publication date: 1 September 2004

Abstract

In 1996, there were about six hundred and fifty overseas‐trained medical doctors who had immigrated to New Zealand but were unable to practice their profession even though the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) had assessed their medical qualifications as equivalent to similar qualifications in New Zea land. These immigrants were subjected to structural discriminator practices of the medical Council of New Zealand (MCNZ) by which qualified medical doctors from non BASIC (Britain, Australia, South Africa, Ireland and Canada) countries were not allowed to register as medical practitioners in New Zealand. The privilege conferred on the MCNZ by the 1968 Medical Practitioners Act allows it to be selective in re cognising medical qualifications. As a consequence of this discriminatory practice many of the foreign trained doctors were unemployed while others worked as process workers, taxi drivers, petrol pump dispensers and pizza deliverymen in the period covered in this article (Selvarajah, 1997). This article provides a case history between 1995 and 2000 on the concerns and conditions of a group of foreign‐trained medical professionals (doctors and specialists) whose application to settle in New Zealand was processed by the New Zealand government prior to June 1995.

Keywords

Citation

Selvarajah, C. (2004), "Equal employment opportunity: acculturation experience of immigrant medical professionals in New Zealand in the period 1995 to 2000", Equal Opportunities International, Vol. 23 No. 6, pp. 50-73. https://doi.org/10.1108/02610150410787693

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited