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Intuition, women managers and gendered stereotypes

John Hayes (Leeds University Business School, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK)
Christopher W. Allinson (Leeds University Business School, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK)
Steven J. Armstrong (Hull University Business School, University of Hull, Hull, UK)

Personnel Review

ISSN: 0048-3486

Article publication date: 1 August 2004

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Abstract

Gender‐centred perspectives of women managers and women in general characterise them as being more intuitive than male managers and men in general. Evidence for gender differences in cognitive style was sought by administering the Cognitive Style Index, a measure of intuition analysis, to three UK samples of managers and three UK samples of non‐managers. Results indicate that there is no difference between female and male managers in terms of intuitive orientation, that female non‐managers are more analytical (less intuitive) than male non‐managers and more analytical than female managers. This lack of support for stereotypic characterisation of women managers and women in general as being more intuitive than their male equivalents is discussed within the context of structural and gendered cultural perspectives on behaviour in organisations.

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Citation

Hayes, J., Allinson, C.W. and Armstrong, S.J. (2004), "Intuition, women managers and gendered stereotypes", Personnel Review, Vol. 33 No. 4, pp. 403-417. https://doi.org/10.1108/00483480410539489

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited