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Numeracy and employment

Samantha Parsons (Research Officer and John Bynner is Professor of Social Statistics and Director of the Social Statistics Research Unit, City University, London, UK)
John Bynner (Professor of Social Statistics and Director of the Social Statistics Research Unit, City University, London, UK)

Education + Training

ISSN: 0040-0912

Article publication date: 1 March 1997

1958

Abstract

Uses National Child Development Study (NCDS) data to examine the employment experiences of men and women assessed with poor numeracy compared with those with good numeracy skills at age 37. To uncover the extent of negative effects of having poor numeracy skills, the sample is restricted to those whose poor or good numeracy was accompanied by good literacy skills. As a further control, much of the analysis is also restricted to those who had left full‐time education at age 16. Maps the proportions in full‐time employment between ages 17 to 37 and demonstrates the very different labour market experiences of the two skills groups in the areas of occupation, training, promotion and income. Concludes that poor numeracy reduces employment opportunities and progress in jobs.

Keywords

Citation

Parsons, S. and Bynner, J. (1997), "Numeracy and employment", Education + Training, Vol. 39 No. 2, pp. 43-51. https://doi.org/10.1108/00400919710164125

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1997, MCB UP Limited

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