Relationship between occupational commitment and ascribed importance of organisational characteristics

Sheldene Simola (Business Administration Program, Trent University, Peterborough, Canada)

Education + Training

ISSN: 0040-0912

Publication date: 15 February 2011

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between dimensions of commitment to the profession of business, and ascribed importance of various organisational characteristics to the first full‐time job following graduation.

Design/methodology/approach

Business administration students (n=446) completed surveys on dimensions of their commitment to the profession of business and the importance they ascribed to having certain organisational characteristics in their first full‐time job (n=132). Confirmatory factor analysis of commitment scales, principal component analysis of organisational characteristics, and canonical correlations were used.

Findings

Affective occupational commitment was differentially, positively associated with the importance ascribed to working in an organisation that offers opportunities for professional development. Normative occupational commitment was differentially, positively associated with the importance ascribed to working in a reputable organisation that is devoted to diversity and social responsibility.

Research limitations/implications

Additional evaluation using multi‐source and behavioural data would be useful.

Practical implications

Knowledge of the relationship between types of occupational commitment and desired organisational characteristics among university students could inform organisational positioning relative to recruitment.

Originality/value

Results reported in this paper demonstrate the potential relevance of occupational commitment components into the processes of recruitment and applicant attraction among university students.

Keywords

Citation

Simola, S. (2011), "Relationship between occupational commitment and ascribed importance of organisational characteristics", Education + Training, Vol. 53 No. 1, pp. 67-81. https://doi.org/10.1108/00400911111102379

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Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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