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Examining the impact of ethics training on business student values

William R. Allen (Department of Management, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA)
Paul Bacdayan (Department of Management, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA)
Kellyann Berube Kowalski (Department of Management, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA)
Mathew H. Roy (Department of Management, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Dartmouth, Massachusetts, USA)

Education + Training

ISSN: 0040-0912

Article publication date: 1 April 2005

Abstract

Purpose

Recent misconduct and highly questionable behavior has fostered considerable distrust, cynicism, and antagonism among the populace toward the leadership of virtually all social institutions. This paper aims to examine the impact of ethics training on business students values.

Design/methodology/approach

Focuses on the central question whether exposure to ethical dilemmas and discussions in the classroom setting will lead to new paradigms of leadership incorporating instrumental values.

Findings

The results support the contention that senior level students were influenced in their perceptions of the importance of instrumental values in comparison to freshmen. As hypothesized no difference was found between men and women in both the importance and reinforcement of the instrumental values examined. The results do not support the contention that increased emphasis on ethics in textbooks and courses has had a significant impact.

Practical implications

Directions for future training are considered in light of the findings.

Originality/value

Points to the conclusion that current models of business education are not helping to reinforce instrumental values.

Keywords

Citation

Allen, W.R., Bacdayan, P., Berube Kowalski, K. and Roy, M.H. (2005), "Examining the impact of ethics training on business student values", Education + Training, Vol. 47 No. 3, pp. 170-182. https://doi.org/10.1108/00400910510592220

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2005, Emerald Group Publishing Limited