To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

Measuring the web impact of digitised scholarly resources

Kathryn E. Eccles (Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK)
Mike Thelwall (Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK)
Eric T. Meyer (Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK)

Journal of Documentation

ISSN: 0022-0418

Article publication date: 20 July 2012

Abstract

Purpose

Webometric studies, using hyperlinks between websites as the basic data type, have been used to assess academic networks, the “impact factor” of academic communications and to analyse the impact of online digital libraries, and the impact of digital scholarly images. This study aims to be the first to use these methods to trace the impact, or success, of digitised scholarly resources in the Humanities. Running alongside a number of other methods of measuring impact online, the webometric study described here also aims to assess whether it is possible to measure a resource's impact using webometric analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

Link data were collected for five target project sites and a range of comparator sites.

Findings

The results show that digitised resources online can leave traces that can be identified and used to assess their impact. Where digitised resources are situated on shifting URLs, or amalgamated into larger online resources, their impact is difficult to measure with these methods, however.

Originality/value

This study is the first to use webometric methods to probe the impact of digitised scholarly resources in the Humanities.

Keywords

Citation

Eccles, K.E., Thelwall, M. and Meyer, E.T. (2012), "Measuring the web impact of digitised scholarly resources", Journal of Documentation, Vol. 68 No. 4, pp. 512-526. https://doi.org/10.1108/00220411211239084

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2012, Emerald Group Publishing Limited