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Recognising the perceived causes of stress – a training and development perspective

Christopher J. Rees (Christopher J. Rees lectures in Occupational Psychology at the Graduate School of Management, the University of Salford, Manchester, UK.)
David Redfern (David Redfern lectures in Employee Relations at the Graduate School of Management, the University of Salford, Manchester, UK.)

Industrial and Commercial Training

ISSN: 0019-7858

Publication date: 1 July 2000

Abstract

Acknowledges that the subject of occupational stress has become a major workplace issue. Suggests that employers may expect training and development specialists to play an increasingly prominent role in tackling stress within the workplace. Identifies a general lack of a consensus about the nature and causes of stress. Illustrates this point by investigating perceptions of occupational stress, as outlined in information dissemination by trade unions and employers’ organisations. Uses core HR activities to provide examples of how different perspectives of occupational stress can be identified. Highlights that training and development specialists can play an important role in ensuring that a balanced and eclectic approach to occupational stress is adopted in the workplace.

Keywords

Citation

Rees, C.J. and Redfern, D. (2000), "Recognising the perceived causes of stress – a training and development perspective", Industrial and Commercial Training, Vol. 32 No. 4, pp. 120-127. https://doi.org/10.1108/00197850010372197

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 2000, MCB UP Limited