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The good, the bad and the ugly of butchers’ shops’ licensing in England – one local authority’s experience

Elizabeth Walker (Derby City Council, Derby, UK)
Nicola Jones (Derby City Council, Derby, UK)

British Food Journal

ISSN: 0007-070X

Article publication date: 1 February 2002

Abstract

Butchers Licensing Regulations have been in force for two years. They require premises which handle unwrapped raw meat and sell raw meat alongside ready to eat foods to operate fully documented food safety management systems. These management systems are in keeping with the seven principles of Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) as detailed by the Codex and are aimed at ensuring food safety and at improving consumer protection. This article focuses on the initial first year work undertaken by Derby City Council to get its 29 butcher’s shops successfully licensed. Data collated and evaluated is presented which gives a clear picture of standards in premises before and after licensing. Standards in the majority of the premises significantly improved and butchers attitudes in general appear to be more positive towards food safety. However substantial costs have been associated with licensing. There are important implications from these costs if the government is to consider licensing the rest of the UK food businesses.

Keywords

Citation

Walker, E. and Jones, N. (2002), "The good, the bad and the ugly of butchers’ shops’ licensing in England – one local authority’s experience", British Food Journal, Vol. 104 No. 1, pp. 20-30. https://doi.org/10.1108/00070700210418712

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 2002, MCB UP Limited