The mechanism of Zn corrosion in both aerated and deaerated aqueous KNO3 solutions

F. Roubani‐Kalantzopoulou (Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, Section of Materials Science and Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Greece)
G. Patermarakis (Department of Chemical Engineering, Section of Materials Science and Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Greece)
H. Karayianni (Department of Chemical Engineering, Section of Materials Science and Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Greece)

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials

ISSN: 0003-5599

Publication date: 1 April 1998

Abstract

The corrosion of Zn in both aerated by air (O2 + N2), and deaerated by N2, solutions of KNO3 at concentrations largely varying, 10‐5‐1 M, is studied. The corrosion process is followed in time by potentiometry and the potential of Zn electrode (vs. calomel) vs. time plots is derived. In both cases, a transition period is observed until a steady state is achieved where the rate of Zn2+ and OH production becomes equal to the rate of Zn(OH)2 precipitate formation. In the aerated solutions the potential and corrosion rate decrease with time while in the deaerated solutions they pass successively through a minimum and a maximum before a steady state is achieved. By a suitable potentiometric analysis the results are explained. The most important factors found to be affecting the mechanism of corrosion process are presented. From the discovery of the mechanism and the factors affecting the Zn corrosion, predictions for promoting or slowing down the corrosion process may be derived.

Keywords

Citation

Roubani‐Kalantzopoulou, F., Patermarakis, G. and Karayianni, H. (1998), "The mechanism of Zn corrosion in both aerated and deaerated aqueous KNO3 solutions", Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, Vol. 45 No. 2, pp. 84-94. https://doi.org/10.1108/00035599810368517

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1998, MCB UP Limited

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