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Chapter 11 Skill Formation and Income Distribution in a Three Class Small Developing Economy

Contemporary and Emerging Issues in Trade Theory and Policy

ISBN: 978-0-4445-3190-2, eISBN: 978-1-84950-541-3

ISSN: 1574-8715

Publication date: 2 June 2008

Abstract

This chapter builds up a simple general equilibrium trade model where, in the absence of a credit market for human capital formation, initial distribution of capital endowment and relevant factor prices determine the size of the three income classes. The poor, with little capital, invests in traditional manufacturing, the middle-income group invests solely in human capital and the rich invests in both. Chances are that such an economy will export both high- and low-skilled goods, importing the middle one. Conventional wisdom suggests that greater skill premium encourages skill formation. In contrast, we show that higher unskilled wage and lower degree of income inequality are consistent with greater skill formation. We also show that protection discourages skill formation and may aggravate inequality.

Keywords

Citation

Marjit, S. (2008), "Chapter 11 Skill Formation and Income Distribution in a Three Class Small Developing Economy", Marjit, S. and Yu, E.S.H. (Ed.) Contemporary and Emerging Issues in Trade Theory and Policy (Frontiers of Economics and Globalization, Vol. 4), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 211-224. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1574-8715(08)04011-6

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2008, Emerald Group Publishing Limited