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Chapter 2: The Ethical Concept of Medicine as a Profession: Its Origins in Modern Medical Ethics and Implications for Physicians

Lost Virtue

ISBN: 978-0-76231-196-5, eISBN: 978-1-84950-339-6

ISSN: 1479-3709

Publication date: 10 October 2006

Abstract

Professional formation and evaluation in medical education lacks a reliable conceptual foundation. This shortcoming results from an insufficient appreciation of the history of medical ethics as the source of the concept of medicine as a profession. This chapter therefore explores the medical ethics of the Scottish physician-ethicist, John Gregory (1724–1773) and the English physician-ethicist, Thomas Percival (1740–1804), who between them invented the concept of medicine as a profession. Three components of this concept are identified: the commitment to scientific and clinical competence; the commitment to protect the patient's health-related interests; and passing on medicine as public trust, not merchant guild.

Citation

McCullough, L.B. (2006), "Chapter 2: The Ethical Concept of Medicine as a Profession: Its Origins in Modern Medical Ethics and Implications for Physicians", Kenny, N. and Shelton, W. (Ed.) Lost Virtue (Advances in Bioethics, Vol. 10), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 17-27. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1479-3709(06)10002-3

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2006, Emerald Group Publishing Limited