To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

18. Delegation Interfaces for Human Supervision of Multiple Unmanned Vehicles: Theory, Experiments, and Practical Applications

Human Factors of Remotely Operated Vehicles

ISBN: 978-0-76231-247-4, eISBN: 978-1-84950-370-9

ISSN: 1479-3601

Publication date: 2 May 2006

Abstract

A fundamental issue driving much of the current research is the design of the interface between humans and ROVs. Autonomous robots are sufficiently different from most computer systems as to require new research and design principles (Adams & Skubic, 2005; Kiesler & Hinds, 2004). Previous work on coordination between humans and automated agents has revealed both benefits and costs of automation for system performance (Parasuraman & Riley, 1997). Automation is clearly essential for the operation of many complex human–machine systems. But in some circumstances automation can also lead to novel problems for operators. Automation can increase workload and training requirements, impair situation awareness and, when particular events co-occur in combination with poorly designed interfaces, lead to accidents (e.g., Degani, 2004; Parasuraman & Riley, 1997).

Citation

Parasuraman, R. and Miller, C. (2006), "18. Delegation Interfaces for Human Supervision of Multiple Unmanned Vehicles: Theory, Experiments, and Practical Applications", Cooke, N.J., Pringle, H.L., Pedersen, H.K. and Connor, O. (Ed.) Human Factors of Remotely Operated Vehicles (Advances in Human Performance and Cognitive Engineering Research, Vol. 7), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 251-266. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1479-3601(05)07018-9

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2006, Emerald Group Publishing Limited