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The diversity challenge: The Representation of Ethnic Minorities in the Dutch Educational System

Higher Education in a Global Society: Achieving Diversity, Equity and Excellence

ISBN: 978-0-76231-182-8, eISBN: 978-1-84950-328-0

ISSN: 1479-358X

Publication date: 1 January 2005

Abstract

The Netherlands is home to approximately three million people of foreign origin. More than a third (35.6 per cent) belongs to one of the four major ethnic groups: Surinamese, Turks, Moroccans and Antilleans (see Table 1). Of the approximately 16.1 million people in the Netherlands, about 12 per cent are considered to be ethnic minorities (excludes foreign nationals and refugees). The Netherlands is thought to have one of the highest rates of ethnic representation in Western Europe, given its geographical size and population. The Netherlands has a non-Dutch population that represents over 15 per cent of the total population. This is almost twice as much as Great Britain, for example, with an ethnic population of about 8 per cent. Even though not all of the non-Dutch population would be considered members of traditional ethnic groups (e.g., white Germans and white Americans), it could be said that at least 10–12 per cent are part of traditional ethnic groups.

Citation

Brug, P. (2005), "The diversity challenge: The Representation of Ethnic Minorities in the Dutch Educational System", Allen, W.R., Bonous-Hammarth, M., Teranishi, R.T. and Dano, O.C. (Ed.) Higher Education in a Global Society: Achieving Diversity, Equity and Excellence (Advances in Education in Diverse Communities, Vol. 5), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 149-158. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1479-358X(05)05007-2

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2006, Emerald Group Publishing Limited