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Endocrinological Processes Associated With Job Stress: Catecholamine and Cortisol Responses to Acute and Chronic Stressors

Employee Health, Coping and Methodologies

ISBN: 978-0-76231-289-4, eISBN: 978-1-84950-399-0

ISSN: 1479-3555

Publication date: 27 March 2006

Abstract

In this chapter, we review empirical research evidence on the relationship between stressors and catecholamines (i.e., adrenaline and noradrenaline) and cortisol. With respect to acute stressors, both laboratory and field research have shown that the exposure to stressors leads to an increase in catecholamine and cortisol levels. With respect to more chronic stressors, research evidence is less consistent. Chronic mental workload was found to be related to elevated adrenaline levels. With respect to cortisol responses the interaction between workload and other variables seems to play a role. Empirical studies suggest that chronic stressors affect the responsivity to acute stressors. Research showed that after the exposure to stressors catecholamine and cortisol recovery is delayed.

Citation

Sonnentag, S. and Fritz, C. (2006), "Endocrinological Processes Associated With Job Stress: Catecholamine and Cortisol Responses to Acute and Chronic Stressors", Perrewé, P.L. and Ganster, D.C. (Ed.) Employee Health, Coping and Methodologies (Research in Occupational Stress and Well Being, Vol. 5), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 1-59. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1479-3555(05)05001-8

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2006, Emerald Group Publishing Limited