DISPLAY RULES AND STRAIN IN SERVICE JOBS: WHAT’S FAIRNESS GOT TO DO WITH IT?

and

Exploring Interpersonal Dynamics

ISBN: 978-0-76231-153-8, eISBN: 978-1-84950-306-8

ISSN: 1479-3555

Publication date: 30 December 2004

Abstract

The link between emotion display rules and job strain has been well established. This chapter draws upon the organizational justice literature to propose a new individual difference, service emotion rule fairness (SERF), to predict job strain for service workers. We propose that when service workers believe that organizational control of emotional displays is unfair they have poor fit with the job and increased strain. In fact, in the survey and experimental studies presented here, SERF uniquely predicted turnover intentions and emotional exhaustion beyond individual and group characteristics. SERF was rated higher when displays to customers are perceived as a means to gain financial rewards or form relationships with others, supporting a self-interest model of fairness, whereas the extent that display rules made one feel controlled, SERF was lower. We also found evidence that those with more social and organizational power perceived that the requirements were fairer. Practical and research implications are discussed.

Citation

Grandey, A. and Fisk, G. (2004), "DISPLAY RULES AND STRAIN IN SERVICE JOBS: WHAT’S FAIRNESS GOT TO DO WITH IT?", Perrewe, P. and Ganster, D. (Ed.) Exploring Interpersonal Dynamics (Research in Occupational Stress and Well Being, Vol. 4), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 265-293. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1479-3555(04)04007-7

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Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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