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Chapter 4 Tightening the ship or slowly sinking? Reshaping teachers’ work conditions

Strong States, Weak Schools: The Benefits and Dilemmas of Centralized Accountability

ISBN: 978-1-84663-910-4, eISBN: 978-1-84663-911-1

ISSN: 1479-3539

Publication date: 18 July 2008

Abstract

The most recent development in the accountability movement occurred in January 2002 when the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) was signed into law. Surprisingly little work has illuminated how teachers experience standards-based accountability policy. Using survey data and interviews, this chapter explores the impact of NCLB requirements, namely adequate yearly progress and needs improvement status, on teacher perceptions of working conditions, especially the use of time and empowerment. I show how the policy has led to restructuring of classroom time and increases in collaboration and yet, simultaneously, a decrease in teachers’ perceptions of empowerment.

Citation

Gordon, K. (2008), "Chapter 4 Tightening the ship or slowly sinking? Reshaping teachers’ work conditions", Fuller, B., Henne, M.K. and Hannum, E. (Ed.) Strong States, Weak Schools: The Benefits and Dilemmas of Centralized Accountability (Research in the Sociology of Education, Vol. 16), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 103-131. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1479-3539(08)16004-9

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2008, Emerald Group Publishing Limited