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Chapter 2 Accountability and teaching practices: School-level actions and teacher responses

Strong States, Weak Schools: The Benefits and Dilemmas of Centralized Accountability

ISBN: 978-1-84663-910-4, eISBN: 978-1-84663-911-1

ISSN: 1479-3539

Publication date: 18 July 2008

Abstract

The design of the ISBA project was guided by an analysis of the SBA theory of action, its likely effect on educators’ work across levels of the educational hierarchy, and prior research on the impact of SBA policies on teachers’ work. We begin placing our work in the context of theoretical accounts of school organizations and the occupational norms of teaching.

Citation

Hamilton, L.S., Stecher, B.M., Lin Russell, J., Marsh, J.A. and Miles, J. (2008), "Chapter 2 Accountability and teaching practices: School-level actions and teacher responses", Fuller, B., Henne, M.K. and Hannum, E. (Ed.) Strong States, Weak Schools: The Benefits and Dilemmas of Centralized Accountability (Research in the Sociology of Education, Vol. 16), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 31-66. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1479-3539(08)16002-5

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2008, Emerald Group Publishing Limited