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ABORIGINAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN CANADA: THOUGHTS ON CURRENT THEORY AND PRACTICE

Ethnic Entrepreneurship: Structure and Process

ISBN: 978-0-76231-033-3, eISBN: 978-1-84950-220-7

ISSN: 1074-7877

Publication date: 4 December 2003

Abstract

This chapter explores economic development and entrepreneurship among Aboriginal1 people in Canada as a particular instance of Indigenous entrepreneurship and development activity worldwide. In turn, Indigenous entrepreneurship, and the economic development that flows from it, can be considered a particular sub-set of ethnic entrepreneurship. What makes Indigenous entrepreneurship a particular and distinct instance of ethic entrepreneurship is the strong tie between the process and place – the historic lands of the particular Indigenous group involved. With Aboriginal populations there is also often a strong component of “nation-building,” or more correctly re-building. This is in contrast with instances of entrepreneurship associated with ethnic groups that have migrated to new places and are pursuing economic opportunities there in ways that distinguish them from the non-ethnic population.

Citation

Anderson, R.B. and Giberson, R.J. (2003), "ABORIGINAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN CANADA: THOUGHTS ON CURRENT THEORY AND PRACTICE", Stiles, C.H. and Galbraith, C.S. (Ed.) Ethnic Entrepreneurship: Structure and Process (International Research in the Business Disciplines, Vol. 4), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 141-167. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1074-7877(03)04007-8

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2003, Emerald Group Publishing Limited