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MAKING SENSE OF THE METANATIONAL: DOES THE FIRM REALLY KNOW WHAT IT KNOWS?

"Theories of the Multinational Enterprise: Diversity, Complexity and Relevance"

ISBN: 978-0-76231-126-2, eISBN: 978-1-84950-285-6

ISSN: 1571-5027

Publication date: 9 November 2004

Abstract

An assumption underlying the concept of the metanational is that the necessary knowledge, ideas, and assets for creating new business opportunities are spread across the world. Most firms, even those that are multinational in scope, are not highly effective at accessing or making use of globally dispersed knowledge because they are deeply embedded in their home market, and their overseas subsidiaries (for the most part) act on the orders of their parent company rather than taking autonomous action.

Citation

Birkinshaw, J. and Arvidsson, N. (2004), "MAKING SENSE OF THE METANATIONAL: DOES THE FIRM REALLY KNOW WHAT IT KNOWS?", Hitt, M.A. and Cheng, J.L.C. (Ed.) "Theories of the Multinational Enterprise: Diversity, Complexity and Relevance" (Advances in International Management, Vol. 16), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, p. 31041. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0747-7929(04)16002-2

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited