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THE IMPACT OF SOCIAL CAPITAL ON AFRICAN-AMERICAN AND WOMEN SURVIVORS OF ORGANIZATIONAL DOWNSIZING

Diversity in the Work Force

ISBN: 978-0-76230-788-3, eISBN: 978-1-84950-107-1

ISSN: 0277-2833

Publication date: 30 October 2004

Abstract

Research has found that African-Americans and women have opportunities for advancement in the traditional corporate environment through resources embedded in their social networks. However, layoffs can affect the composition of their social networks, their positions in the networks, and rewards from those networks. I suggest that the racial, cultural, and gender differences between African-American and women layoff survivors and White and male layoff survivors will negatively affect their access to and benefits from social capital resources. Yet, strong tie relationships with White and male layoff survivors in key strategic positions can help African-American and women survivors maintain their existing job position because they can then borrow the social capital resources of the White and male survivors. Thus, while research has found that weak ties help individuals advance in their workplaces, strong tie relationships with majority groups may be more beneficial to minority groups in maintaining their position after a layoff.

Citation

Parks-Yancy, R. (2004), "THE IMPACT OF SOCIAL CAPITAL ON AFRICAN-AMERICAN AND WOMEN SURVIVORS OF ORGANIZATIONAL DOWNSIZING", DiTomaso, N. and Post, C. (Ed.) Diversity in the Work Force (Research in the Sociology of Work, Vol. 14), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 87-103. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0277-2833(04)14004-1

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited