TOO POOR TO GET SICK? THE IMPLICATIONS OF PLACE, RACE, AND COSTS ON THE HEALTH CARE EXPERIENCES OF RESIDENTS IN POOR URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS

Chronic Care, Health Care Systems and Services Integration

ISBN: 978-0-76231-147-7, eISBN: 978-1-84950-300-6

ISSN: 0275-4959

Publication date: 30 December 2004

Abstract

Literature suggests that the poor often face a myriad of health care constraints and health problems. This study uses bivariate and multivariate analyses to examine the effects of systemic factors such as the availability of health care providers and neighborhood poverty on individual health decisions for a sample of African Americans, Whites, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans in poor Chicago neighborhoods. Results show that Medicaid usage and having a regular physician increase the number of days home ill and days hospitalized, while frequenting clinics decreases such activity. Additionally, residents in more impoverished urban areas are less likely to stay home ill. Differences in health profiles and providers are also evident based on race/ethnicity. These findings illustrate the important relationship between macro-level factors and specific health choices many residents in poor urban areas make at the micro-level.

Citation

Barnes, S. (2004), "TOO POOR TO GET SICK? THE IMPLICATIONS OF PLACE, RACE, AND COSTS ON THE HEALTH CARE EXPERIENCES OF RESIDENTS IN POOR URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS", Jacobs Kronenfeld, J. (Ed.) Chronic Care, Health Care Systems and Services Integration (Research in the Sociology of Health Care, Vol. 22), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 47-64. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0275-4959(04)22003-8

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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