Consensus or Polarization? Business and Labour Elites in Germany and Norway

Comparative Studies of Social and Political Elites

ISBN: 978-0-76231-379-2, eISBN: 978-1-84950-466-9

ISSN: 0195-6310

Publication date: 11 December 2006

Abstract

Several scholars have maintained that corporatist arrangements may contribute to a national consensus between groups with opposing interests (Katzenstein, 1985; Siaroff, 1999). Some have even described (neo) corporatism as a strategy for consensus building (Woldendorp, 1995). These general viewpoints seem to imply that participation in the various channels and networks in a corporatist system may influence participants to moderate their ideological attitudes, to become more centrist. Participation has a “civilising” effect. In a study of the Swedish industrial relations system Öberg and Svensson (2002) concluded, however, that there is not much trust across the class borders, a finding which questions the validity of these assumptions. It seems therefore appropriate to test these assumptions empirically in a variety of national settings.

Citation

Gulbrandsen, T. and Hoffmann-Lange, U. (2006), "Consensus or Polarization? Business and Labour Elites in Germany and Norway", Engelstad, F. and Gulbrandsen, T. (Ed.) Comparative Studies of Social and Political Elites (Comparative Social Research, Vol. 23), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 103-135. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0195-6310(06)23006-0

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2006, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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