Case studies

Teaching cases offers students the opportunity to explore real world challenges in the classroom environment, allowing them to test their assumptions and decision-making skills before taking their knowledge into the workplace.

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Case study
Publication date: 1 February 2023

Keratiloe Mogotsi, Bhekinkosi Moyo and Angie Urban

The learning outcomes focus on enabling students to view operational model changes critically, as they pertain to:■ evaluating different management styles and uses of the…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes focus on enabling students to view operational model changes critically, as they pertain to:

■ evaluating different management styles and uses of the ADKAR change management model in decision-making moments in times of crisis (such as COVID-19) in non-profit organisations (NPOs);

■ evaluating different ways in which NPOs pivot to sustainability, including the use of social enterprise models and change management;

■ anticipating and managing change in institutional formations through new technologies;

■ articulating trade-offs between grant and non-grant resource mobilisation for African philanthropy; and

■ application of change management theory to organisations’ sustainability journeys.

Case overview/synopsis

In May 2020, working from her home office just over one month into a nationwide lockdown because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Masego Madzwamuse, chief executive officer (CEO) of the Southern Africa Trust (the Trust), knew that it could once again be at a crossroads. In 2015, the Trust had found itself in a quandary when its primary donor gave notification of its intention to withdraw its funding. The Trust had responded by making changes to its structure and strategy. Now, with uncertainty rife throughout South Africa, the CEO knew that she had to consider whether the changes that had been implemented over the past five years had prepared the Trust not only to respond to, but also to survive the pandemic and continue its vital work long into the future.

Complexity academic level

Postgraduate Diploma in Management, MBA, Masters in Management.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Case study
Publication date: 27 January 2023

Boris Urban and Stephanie Althea Townsend

The learning outcomes of this study are as follows:▪ evaluate the difficulties of entry-level women entrepreneurs in the South African farming industry;▪ appreciate the…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes of this study are as follows:▪ evaluate the difficulties of entry-level women entrepreneurs in the South African farming industry;▪ appreciate the entrepreneurial journey of a women entrepreneur in the farming industry;▪ assess the role of networking and support programmes in prompting women entrepreneurs in South Africa;▪ understand the role of diversification in building a sustainable business in today’s COVID-19-affected economic environment;▪ make an informed decision regarding how COVID-19 had negatively affected the farming industry; and▪ critically evaluate which options are available for women entrepreneurs to overcome the negative effects of COVID-19 and remain sustainable businesses.

Case overview/synopsis

In April 2021, managing director and co-owner Beverley-Anne Joseph, was considering the long-term business strategy options for Zelpy, her hop farm business outside George, a town in the Western Cape, South Africa. As the first black woman hop farmer in Africa, she had run a successful business supplying hops to South African Breweries (SAB), a subsidiary of the global conglomerate Anheuser-Busch InBev (AB InBev). To date, her hop farming business had not been impacted by the South African Government’s COVID-19 lockdowns that impacted the sale of alcoholic beverages. However, it had given her a wake-up call as to the risk of having most of her eggs in one basket. She now had to consider how to diversify her farming business to minimise risk.

Complexity academic level

MBA, Masters in Management, Postgraduate Diploma in Business and Executive Education short courses.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2023

Junaid Akhtar and Iqra Abdullah

The aim of the case is to understand the performance management system of academic staff members in higher education institution. Furthermore, students would be able to…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The aim of the case is to understand the performance management system of academic staff members in higher education institution. Furthermore, students would be able to compare two performance appraisal policies and analyze which one could better serve the purpose considering the context of educational institution. The case would help students understand the performance dynamics of the academic staff and how the performance management system in place affect employees.

Case overview/synopsis

The case study presents a troubling situation faced by Asim Khan, a newly appointed director of the Midland University, regarding retention of the faculty. Upon joining Midland, Khan noticed a trend that faculty who was serving the university from many years are leaving the organization one after the other. He decided to revise the faculty policies that he believed was the root cause of faculty turnover in Midland. He formulated a committee to review the existing policies and revamp if required. The committee identified some flaws in the faculty appraisal policy in place at that time and formulated a new one with the consultation of top management. However, when the new appraisal policy was presented to the faculty, few faculty members raised their eyes over a few aspects of the proposed policy. As the new academic year was approaching, Khan had to make an important decision after critically analyzing the pros and cons of both policies that which of the two should be followed for the upcoming year’s appraisals.

Complexity academic level

The case can potentially be used in the post-graduate courses in MBA programs offering a major in human resource management.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 6: Human resource management.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 17 January 2023

Akriti Chugh, Ubada Aqeel and Shikha Gera

After completing the case, the students shall be able to do the following:▪ explain the key features and roles associated with non-governmental organizations (NGOs;…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

After completing the case, the students shall be able to do the following:▪ explain the key features and roles associated with non-governmental organizations (NGOs; comprehension);▪ describe major activities/programs run by Kilkaari-Bachpan Ki (knowledge);▪ describe the challenges faced by not-for-profit, non-governmental and voluntary organizations operating at a local level (knowledge);▪ developing TOWS matrix for Kilkaari’s strengths, weaknesses, threats and opportunities to provide strategies for making the necessary change (analysis);▪ explain the change management strategies used by Kilkaari during COVID-19 using Kurt Lewin’s model (analysis); and▪ develop recommendations for the problems faced by Kilkaari (evaluation).

Case overview/synopsis

As a result of the global COVID-19 pandemic, the entire world was left in shambles. The epidemic has had a profound impact on the way organizations used to function. It compelled all sectors and companies to change their working methods and move closer to virtual conceptions. Organizations that were able to adapt to the new environment have thrived, while the rest have struggled and continue to struggle. In today’s world, embracing virtual scenarios is more about perseverance and consistency than it is about making a conscious decision. Organizations such as NGOs have limited financial and non-financial means to adapt to such changes, and some of them were unable to suffice during the tough times.Despite this, the current case study focuses on the NGOs’ path during the pandemic: Kilkaari-Bachpan Ki. The NGO’s primary objective is to provide underprivileged children with free access to education. The current scenario illustrates how the Kilkaarians (team members of Kilkaari) modified their behavior in response to the crisis. To be used in an organizational behavior course, the case is intended for management students. Kurt Lewin’s model of change, which includes unfreezing, mobility and refreezing, can be understood by students. For this research, the authors use a case-study approach to explore how the organization responded when faced with a crisis.

Complexity academic level

This case is suitable for undergraduate students learning organizational behavior course, strategic management and also relevant to social work courses (social entrepreneurship/NGOs).

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 6: Human resource management.

Case study
Publication date: 11 January 2023

Jabulile Msimango-Galawe, Amanda Bowen and Angie Urban

At the end of the case discussion, students should be able to:▪ analyse and discuss networks as a form of social capital;▪ identify and discuss alternative growth…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

At the end of the case discussion, students should be able to:▪ analyse and discuss networks as a form of social capital;▪ identify and discuss alternative growth strategies for an small, medium, micro enterprise (SMME) in the context of prevailing challenges;▪ use the six domains of the entrepreneurship ecosystem to identify and discuss factors that enhance and challenge a business with particular reference to an SMME; and▪ analyse and understand the key dimensions of entrepreneurial behaviour using the case protagonist as an example.

Case overview/synopsis

Nhlanhla Dlamini, the managing director of Maneli Pets based in Johannesburg, South Africa had opened an office in Cincinnati in the USA in July 2019 to take over the distribution and marketing of the company’s high-quality protein pet treats. Just over eight months later, the COVID-19 pandemic exploded across the world resulting in unprecedented disruption to people’s lives, world trade and the global economy.Now, in June 2022, Dlamini contemplated the successes and challenges he had experienced since starting Maneli Pets in 2016, not least of which was parting company with US-based Novel Dog LLC, which had previously marketed and distributed the pet treats. He had built an internationally accredited factory from scratch, produced pet products and a brand that was appealing to the competitive international market, and exported to 12 countries around the world. However, Dlamini had also faced the retrenchment of a large number of staff, the breakdown of the relationship with Novel Dog, the difficulties of setting up a distribution business in the USA along with overseeing the South African factory, and in September 2019, his co-founder, Sipha Ndawonde, had left Maneli Pets.Maneli Pets had served Dlamini’s philanthropic purpose of creating jobs and contributing to the growth of the South African economy. Despite the setback of parting ways with Novel Dog, he hoped to continue to create jobs and return to and exceed the staff numbers he had achieved by 2018, regardless of the hard work involved.In his dual position of managing director of Maneli Pets, based in Johannesburg, and sales director of the distribution and marketing arm, Nandi Pets Inc. in Cincinnati, Dlamini had a global view of the companies’ financials that he realised had been missing initially. Would the new structure of Maneli Pets he had created in 2019 in a pre-pandemic world see the company profitable by the end of 2022? What else could he do to take the company to the next level?

Complexity academic level

MBA, Masters in Management, Postgraduate Diploma in Business, Executive Education short courses.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Case study
Publication date: 6 January 2023

Irene Johnson, Nobin Thomas, Joshy Joseph, Priya Narayanan and Ameya Nambudiri

The case is an example of the dilemma and constraints an entrepreneur faces as they go forward in implementing ideas while setting up an enterprise. Through the eyes of…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The case is an example of the dilemma and constraints an entrepreneur faces as they go forward in implementing ideas while setting up an enterprise. Through the eyes of John, the case helps the participants to understand and analyse two distinct business models, the bricks and clicks model and an online aggregator model and evaluate them using a visual business tool like the business model canvas (BMC). Thus, the case helps the participants to:▪ Analyse the customer segments and demand.▪ Apply frameworks for analysing a new venture’s prospects.▪ Understand two distinct business models and learn how to sketch a business model using the BMC.▪ Compare various business model designs using the BMC template.

Case overview/synopsis

Set against the backdrop of high consumerism and haute couture, conventroad.com is an example of fashion aggregation and curation in the online platform. Once known as the fashion hub of Kerala with its crowded streets, cramped with boutiques on each corner, Convent Road lost its following as big and major stores left the miniscule space for better facilities in the name of development. This case follows Rijin John, founder and developer, through the course of his idea conceptualisation. In an attempt to regain its popularity through the internet, John set out to rope all the popular Convent Road boutiques into one platform. But, as more options became available, John was in a dilemma about whether he should continue to try to convince the indifferent boutique owners to be a part of his enterprise or explore an alternative model and create a platform for weavers while sacrificing the brand value of Convent Road.

Complexity academic level

The case is designed for use in an undergraduate or graduate-level course on entrepreneurship, marketing, business policy and managing growing ventures.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Case study
Publication date: 6 January 2023

Umesh Mahtani, Arpita Neeraj Amarnani and Vithal Sukhathankar

▪ Students learn how an educational institute impacts water resources on the campus and its surrounding community.▪ Students acquire knowledge on how decision-making…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

▪ Students learn how an educational institute impacts water resources on the campus and its surrounding community.

▪ Students acquire knowledge on how decision-making, related to natural resources, is influenced by the institute’s obligations towards surrounding communities and the long-term sustainability of the resources.

▪ Students become acquainted with the decision-making process adopted by an educational institute for achieving resource-efficient development on the campus.

▪ Students learn how to design evaluation methods for investments related to water conservation at an educational institute.

▪ Students become proficient with the payback method specifically when evaluating water-enhancing projects at an educational campus.

Case overview/synopsis

Dr Ajit Parulekar, Director at Goa Institute of Management (GIM), Goa, India, was evaluating options to improve the sources of water at GIM at the beginning of 2021. He was reviewing the projects proposed to meet the water requirement at the campus for the next five years (2021–2025). The projects were recommended by consultants (ENV Consultants Pvt Ltd) who proposed a total expenditure of US$68,667 which involved storage enhancement and water table upgradation (See Case Exhibit 11). The maintenance department had studied the plans but their projections showed that the execution of these projects and initiatives would still lead to a deficit of water in the future. Dr Parulekar reviewed the reports and weighed the expected tangible and intangible benefits from the proposed projects. The projects had to be carefully selected, keeping in mind the multiple objectives to be met: an increase in water supply within a short time, a financially optimum investment and a minimum impact on the surrounding community. The selected projects had to meet the long-term sustainability objective of resource efficiency at the campus.

Complexity academic level

Students studying finance, project appraisal, campus sustainability at graduate or postgraduate management programs.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 4: Environmental Management.

Case study
Publication date: 19 December 2022

Juan Ernesto Perez Perez

At the end of the case students will be able to:1. Relate risk as one of the 12 principles in project management contemplated in the international standards of the PMBOK…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

At the end of the case students will be able to:

1. Relate risk as one of the 12 principles in project management contemplated in the international standards of the PMBOK Seventh Edition guide.

2. Determine high-level risks by articulating the WBS and RBS of a construction project.

3. Perform a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the probability and impact of risks through the heat map tool and the Expected Monetary Value (EMV) technique.

4. Propose the different response strategies contemplated in the risk management through the formulation of a response and contingency plan.

Case overview/synopsis

MORESA S.A.S was a family company founded in 1994, whose value proposition focused on construction and permanent advice for the execution of innovative and contemporary projects with more than 27 years of experience in the city of San José de Cucuta, department of Norte de Santander, Colombia. The objective of the case is to Relate risk as one of the 12 principles in project management contemplated in the international standards of the PMBOK Seventh Edition guide; Determine high-level risks by articulating the WBS and RBS of a construction project; Perform a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the probability and impact of risks through the heat map tool and the Expected Monetary Value (EMV) technique and propose the different response strategies contemplated in the risk management through the formulation of a response and contingency plan. The teaching case is designed for academic programs in areas of knowledge of civil engineering, architecture and at postgraduate level such as: Master’s in civil engineering, Master’s in risk management, Master in project management or MBA. For this case, an expert judgment was developed with professionals belonging to different areas of knowledge. Likewise, secondary information was collected from the organization's strategic documents and the analogous estimation through the historical records of the project portfolio developed by the construction company. Finally, the case, classified in the Built Environment, a challenge that project managers must face in VUCA environment through risk management.

Complexity academic level

The teaching case is designed for academic programs in areas of knowledge of civil engineering, architecture and at postgraduate level such as: Master’s in civil engineering, Master’s in risk management, Master’s in project management or MBA. In the modules of risk management, project management, international standards, the case guides the applicability of methods and artifacts used in risk management considering the process identification, quantitative, qualitative analysis, and development of response strategies and contingency plans.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 2: Built Environment.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 16 December 2022

Boris Urban and Stephanie Townsend

At the end of the case discussion, students should be able to: Evaluate the relevance of community and networks to immigrant entrepreneurs. Appreciate the…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

At the end of the case discussion, students should be able to:

 Evaluate the relevance of community and networks to immigrant entrepreneurs.

 Appreciate the entrepreneurial journey of immigrant entrepreneurs in the South African context.

 Consider the challenges of the socio-economic environment affecting businesses in South Africa.

 Make an informed decision regarding how creating a family entrepreneurial ecosystem can mitigate business risk.

 Critically evaluate which strategies could exploit any further opportunities and grow the businesses.

Case overview/synopsis

In April 2022, Ahmed Mujtaba Razzak, director of Montage Interior Solutions, a design, building and construction company based in Mayfair, Johannesburg, was preparing for the official opening of the company’s newly-built Clifton Mall. Ahmed, whose family had immigrated to South Africa from Pakistan in 2004, had big goals for the mall: he wanted it not only to be profitable for his family, but also to help uplift the lives of the shop owners and the members of the surrounding community, many of whom were also from Pakistani immigrant families. Thus, instead of having to rent the units, shop owners were able to buy them under sectional title. The model promised the benefits of unit ownership for the shop owners and a quicker return on investment for Montage. As he prepared for the opening, Ahmed wondered whether he had set everything up for the venture to be able to achieve his goals.

The case study provided a deeper understanding of different challenges, approaches and strategies used in immigrant start-ups. The case study included various business and entrepreneurship themes focused on immigrant start-ups, strategy and diversification, family business and business growth. It also considered both individual and contextual factors influencing immigrant entrepreneurship, insofar as family and the business are “inextricably intertwined”, where the effects of social exchange between generations meant that successful enterprising families showed tremendous respect for the sensitive relations between the business and the family.

Complexity academic level

Postgraduate Diploma, MBA, Masters, Executive Education

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 16 December 2022

Daniel Muravsky, Snezhana Muravskaia, Diana Akkalaeva and Sofia Shkaruba

The case demonstrated the importance of cultural peculiarities and mechanisms of customer learning in localizing global marketing campaigns. It introduced the consequences…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The case demonstrated the importance of cultural peculiarities and mechanisms of customer learning in localizing global marketing campaigns. It introduced the consequences of unexpected spillover of viral marketing and PR scandals on the competition. It helps in developing the students’ ability to determine and assess the impact of viral marketing campaigns from the perspectives of various stakeholders of the organization.

Case overview/synopsis

In 2017, Nike Russia created one of the most successful and influential ad campaigns in the Russian women's sportswear market by encouraging young girls to try new sports. At the same time, Reebok launched a successful worldwide “be more human” campaign aimed at empowering women all around the globe. Two years later, Reebok Russia tried to localize the successful campaign while adjusting the message to be more assertive. As a result, the company met a country-wide outrage from both feminists and anti-feminists. The case centers around Nikolay Borisov, the CEO of Nike Russia, who was unexpectedly drawn into a provocative public discussion on the use of the female empowerment agenda for cause-related marketing. The case dilemma was set during mid-February 2019 and involved Borisov’s assessment of the impact of the competitor’s viral campaign on the market and choice of a reaction strategy to public outrage.

Complexity academic level

This case is appropriate for an undergraduate or graduate-level program curriculum for courses dedicated to or including topics related to positioning, doing business in emerging markets, corporate social responsibility and consumer behavior. Before engaging with the case, the students should be aware of basic management and economics-related concepts and terms, such as strategy, positioning, CSR and viral marketing.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

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